Thursday, March 23, 2017

Building Unity Farm Sanctuary - Fourth Week of March 2017

It�s officially Spring and although the weather is cold and snowy, the anticipation of warmer weather means that Unity Farm Sanctuary is more active than ever.

This week, a local young woman purchased our goose eggs and made traditional Ukrainian Pysanky Easter eggs.   We were impressed.

The owners of Penny Blossom, the Yorkshire pig living at the sanctuary for a year, brought us empty wire cable spools.    The goats are jumping from spool to spool, having a great time.

This week, we finished creating the last bedroom at the Sanctuary using a 1760�s bed we found in Plymouth.   It was not designed to use a mattress and has spools for ropes to hold straw.    Each night you tighten your ropes so you �sleep tight�.   That�s actually where the term comes from.  Sanctuary guests would likely have trouble maintaining the ropes and straw, so I created a bed frame.

The most important development this week is that we finished clearing the land between the farm and sanctuary in preparation of new animal paddocks for rescue operations.   Here�s a view of the freshly cleared land with a herd of deer running across it.   In April we�ll install 1700 feet of fencing to create 4 paddocks, each with its own 24 foot mini-barn.   We�ve been collecting pottery for a charity sale in the Spring.   My daughter joking refers to this area of the property as the �pot farm�.

On the south side of the sanctuary, there are 27 acres of rural land trust open space.   We�re creating trails that connect the open space with our land, eventually resulting in 5 miles of walkable trails over the combined land.   We hope to expand our bee hives to the meadow in the open space.

I�ve designed paths that follow the natural topography of the land and while exploring the property, I found long abandoned bee hives.   My wife asked me to remove them to avoid any potential spread of spores from old American foul brood, but  irst I have to talk to the mouse who is renting the old hive!

Over the next few years, we�ll reintegrate the Sherborn land that was originally laid out in the Revolutionary war.  If we�re lucky, the assembly of land we own, land trust, wetlands, and  farm designated land will result in  200 acres of contiguous agricultural land for the public.

This weekend, we�ll finish the the repair of the sanctuary building, fixing all the windows and screens in the original 1830's building and the newer construction areas.  I�ve purchased enough spare parts to restore 50 windows/screens  to their original condition.   I suspect that by the end of the weekend my hands will be a bit strained!
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